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Annual Report 2017

Letter from The Chief

 

            First I want to thank the Community for allowing me to be your Fire Chief.  The responsibility of Fire Chief is a daunting task and the Junction City Community has been gracious in accepting myself and my family to the community.

            As your Fire Chief, I believe the opportunities for service are also a great responsibility to have. As we develop our department to better serve the needs of the community we must change how we conduct our business.  Change is a word that brings emotions of uncertainty to the front. This brings reluctance and a resistance as what is needed to be done as this may not be what has been done. Complacency in any organization is not healthy as the surroundings change, grow and become different; complacency creates resistance. 

            We must continue to change so we can provide services to the community.  These changes require open and real communications.  Having these in place allows for growth both professional and personal. Our department is capable of doing great things as long as we accept the need to grow, learn and accept the responsibility that comes with change.  Through the first year JCFD has experienced change and this will continue as we strive to meet the needs of our community which we are responsible for; Fire, Emergency Medical Services, Technical Rescue, and Hazardous Materials Response. 

            Our role in the community is challenging, we must provide the highest level of service in the worst day in the lives of the people we serve.  How we preform is based on our professional approach to service and the long standing tradition of providing that service by gaining the needed knowledge and skills to meet the challenges our community presents.

 

Kindest Regards,

 

Terry L Johnson, EFO

City of Junction City Fire Department


 

Summary

            The City of Junction City Fire Department (JCFD) is the primary response for the City of Junction City, Kansas for Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS).  The department is a direct operation of the City and is responsible to the community for the highest quality services possible.  The department has 5 administrative personnel; Fire Chief, Division Operations Chief, Division Training Chief, Fire Marshal and Office Manager.  There are 48 positions assigned with 16 personnel on each shift.  Each shift is divided to 2 stations with 8 personnel each.  Each station has a Captain, Engineers and Firefighters assigned.  All members are trained from the Emergency Medical Technician to Paramedic level qualification for response to EMS calls.

            The JCFD in 2017 responded to 3,280 EMS calls for service and 1,869 fire calls for service, for a total of 5,129 calls for service to the community and an average of 38 medical transfers between medical facilities per month for a total of 459 transfers for 2017. 

            During the 2017 year of service the JCFD was assessed for operational needs this was a yearlong process that began with the Insurance Service Office’s (ISO) Fire Suppression Rating Schedule (FSRS) Inspection in December of 2016.  The JCFD received a rating of 3/3X, ISO collects and evaluates information from communities in the United States on their structure fire suppression capabilities. The data is analyzed using our Fire Suppression Rating Schedule (FSRS) and then a Public Protection Classification (PPC™) grade is assigned to the community.  The rating system is passed on a 10 to 1 schedule 10 being minimal protection and 1 being the highest protection.  

            The JCFD has changed in Operational areas to better serve the community and reduce duplication in the processes of the department. Through an assessment of department operations and processes we have developed a new approach to providing services to the community the reorganization of the department into Administration Division with a Training Division and a Fire Marshal and the Operations Division.  This reorganization simplified needed responsibilities to a single office.  This allows for information to flow as needed in a timely manner and increase efficiency to the shareholder and customer.

            This Annual Report will give the long range plans for the JCFD to provide the needed scope of service to the community and meet the needs as the community changes.  By working towards these goals WE can make our services better and in return make Junction City a safer and better home for all.

 


 JCFD

Mission Statement

 

 

Provide the services needed to the shareholders and customers of

The City of Junction City, Kansas

and exceed the expectations of the shareholder and customer

By 

 Doing The Right Thing

And

Doing The Right Thing Right

 And

Be Nice

 

 

 

Vision Statement

 

The Junction City Fire Department (JCFD) will strive at all times to serve the Community of Junction City as a partner in Fire & Life Safety.

OUR DEPARTMENT WILL:

Provide the services needed to meet the community’s needs as an all hazards response agency. This will be accomplished through planning, prevention, education, mitigation and appropriate application of technology and safety practices.

We will maintain good stewardship of the resources provided by the community.

Develop Life Safety Goals as a team to provide Fire & Life Safety

Education for the Shareholders & Customers

We will provide professional service at all times

We will work to improve ourselves through:

Education,        Team Work,          Respect,    Discipline

&

TRUST

 

 

Fire Service Ethics 


AS A FIRE SERVICE PROFESSIONAL:

MMY FUNDIMENTAL DUTY IS TO SERVE MANKIND AND TO SAFEGUARD LIVES AND PROPERTY.

 

I WILL:

v KEEP MY PRIVATE LIFE UNSULLIED AS AN EXAMPLE TO ALL.

 

v MAINTAIN COURAGEOUS CALM IN THE FACE OF DANGER, SCORN OR RIDICULE AND DEVELOP SELF-RESTRAINT.

 

v BE CONSTANTLY MINDFUL OF THE WELFARE OF OTHERS.

 

v HONEST IN THOUGHT AND IN DEED IN BOTH MY PERSONAL AND OFFICIAL LIFE.

 

I WILL BE EXEMPLARY IN OBEYING STATE LAWS, LOCAL ORDINANCES, REGULATIONS AS WELL AS THE POLICIES, PRECEDURES AND GUIDELINES OF MY DEPARTMENT.


JCFD CREED

Joint Fire and EMS operations provide our

Community with professional

Faithful and diverse workforce

Dedicated to saving lives and property


 

JUNCTION CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT SERVICES DESCRIPTION

                                                                                                                    

Form of Ownership

The City of Junction City as an entity through the Shareholders and Customers of the City of Junction City who are the sole Owners and controlling Governmental Authority for the Junction City Fire Department (JCFD).

Most important strengths and core competencies

            The members of the JCFD are the core and the strength of the department; being such the members of the department are held to a high standard of Professional, Ethical, and Moral Conduct.  All members of the department are encouraged to hold credentials that meet or exceed the standards of the State of Kansas, the International Fire Service Accreditation Commission (IFSAC), National Professional Board and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA).  Every member of the JCFD is encouraged to have as a minimum standard, Firefighter II, Hazardous Materials Operations, National Registry Emergency Medical Technician to Emergency Medical Technician Paramedic.

Significant challenges the department faces now and in the future

The JCFD faces may challenges as the community faces the ever-changing economic climate of a today’s governing body.  The challenges for the department are not limited to the perception of the fire service, as the educational, residential, commercial, industrial and recreational venues of the community establish a need for the department to adapt to the needs of the community to meet the expectations of the shareholder and customer. 

 The challenges include the dangers of fire, medical emergencies, trauma incidents, marine emergencies, natural events, man made events and education of the public in the areas of Fire & Life Safety.  These challenges represent a need for a positive and progressive agency to respond to the needs of the community as they occur.  Through preparation, education, and an understanding of the services expected the department continues to prepare to serve the community.

  The Department’s budget as provided by the city based on the standard budget process for the State of Kansas to provide fire, Advanced Life Support Emergency medical Services, rescue, hazardous materials response and support to the city and to Geary County.

The Department

            The JCFD has the dedication of career members who provide services to the shareholders and customers of the community; the department has two stations serving the city.  The department’s stations are strategically located to respond to the needs of the community as efficiently as possible. 

            The department’s chain of command has the responsibility to provide a positive and productive atmosphere for members to conduct business of the department in a professional and ethical manner to promote safety and teamwork for all members of the department. 

            The department has two (2) active sets of members to provide the Share Holder and Customer the effective and efficient services as one department the administrative and operational branches.  The department head is the Fire Chief of the Department, who functions as the formal leader of the department and manages the operational and administrative responsibilities of the department.

 

The JCFD has three (3) shifts assigned to two (2) stations that have a two (2) Captains, three (3) Engineer(s) and eleven (11) firefighters/EMT to EMT Paramedics per shift.  The Division Chief of Operations is responsible for supervision of the assigned shifts.  The Captains supervise the assigned personnel and work under the supervision of a Division Chief of Operations. The members assigned to the station facilitate the response needed to that district for the assigned area and provide additional manpower to the adjoining district. The Division Chief of Operations manages the assigned operational and administrative needs as well as the overall supervision of operations as needed at incidents.  Each station will have assigned a Captain, Engineer(s), Firefighter II and/or Firefighter I and probationary Firefighter personnel that are trained at the Emergency Medical Technician, Advanced or Paramedic Level to meet the response needs of the stations district.

The Division Training Chief is responsible for the coordination and record keeping of all training for the department. The Division Training Chief manages programs to ensure all Fire and EMS skills are up to date and the instructors are provided with the tools needed to present quality programs for the students. Development and implementation of a sound training and educational program for members of the department is essential for initial and continuing education needs. The Division Chief of Training coordinates with the Division Operations Chief, EMS Team and the Training Team to ensure the needs of the department are being met and provide support for the programs requested. The Division Chief of training also has the responsibility of the Department Incident Safety Officer and General Safety Officer for the department.

The Fire Marshal is the Fire Inspector and lead Fire Investigator for the Department.  This Fire Marshal maintains the records of ongoing inspections program and relates data to ensure the customer is educated on the need to follow the Fire & Life Safety Codes approved by the City.  The Fire Marshal is responsible for management of the Fire Investigation process to ensure all Federal and State standards are followed and coordinate with the State of Kansas Fire Marshal’s Office, Local Law Enforcement and the Fire Investigation Team in all Investigations and training to ensure the highest quality of service in all responsibilities.  

The JCFD also provides Emergency Medical Services (EMS) at the Advanced Life Support (ALS) level for the City of Junction City and all of Geary County, Kansas.  In addition to providing coverage for Emergency Medical Services for the community the department provides inter - facility convalescent transport for the local Geary Community Hospital and other health care facilities in Geary County. Our service response model requires our members to be qualified as required by the State of Kansas Board Emergency Medical Services to the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), Advanced – EMT or EMT - Paramedic levels.   




 


Operational Review

            JCFD Operations are challenged by the community’s need of services and the need to provide the highest level of services to the shareholders and customers in the community.  The services provided by our personnel are professional and of high quality may of the needs of the department are being discovered as we move forward and work to ensure the completeness of services. 

            JCFD has in the 2017 year of operation had many changes and challenges to the department.  The entry of a new Fire Chief brings a new direction for leadership and management to the department.  This causes an approach of personnel to be unsure and cautious of changes to the department.  Mostly in part of the familiarity of conducting business as usual and the complacency that sets in with time in any organization.  The changes over the past year; either minor or major, have an impact on the personnel.  Change is a difficult process for those that have a perception of what is and are missing the need to see the reality of what has to be done.

            As the process of assessing the department has evolved many of the conditional operations were not fully completed.  This included a full set of Departmental Policies, Procedures and Guidelines (PPG) for Fire and EMS Operations.  Multiple sets of these processes were in the department system; however, NONE were an approved assembly of any form and caused confusion among the department.  A total of 12 different rule sets were discovered in various stages of completion. This created a need to develop a standard single PPG for the department.  This process is also in progress for the EMS Operations of the department where 6 different documents were found. To remove as much confusion as possible the department is working on a new single protocol and procedures for EMS to meet the needs of the department.

            Responsibilities of Officers traditionally held in departments similar to the JCFD were not being processed by the Company Officer and many of the responsibilities were being duplicated unnecessarily.  This lead to duplication of work, misunderstandings and moral issues.  Company Officers are responsible for their company at their stations; with the previous system of command this was not the case as majority of the decisions for daily operations was being processed and directed by Battalion Chiefs. This duplication of work reduced the Company Officer to a lesser position of no real importance. Supervision of the Company Officer should be the role of a Battalion Chief and following of the process in a professional manner is necessary.

            Response for service in the JCFD is a fully functional and professional response.  The quality of service in the Fire and EMS services of the department is EXCELLENT. The public receives the services from JCFD in a professional and caring manner at all times this is the core of the department.  The education as to the non-Response Service responsibilities is where the JCFD needs to improve. 

            The improvement needed is to understand that the actual response to calls is not the only part of the responsibility the department has.  The process of improving skills, documentation and the ever changing regulations that affect the department from the Federal, State and Local Governing bodies. Having skills to deliver service in both response and daily responsibilities is of the upmost importance to the community and department as well as the individual personnel of the department.

         The JCFD in 2017 responded to 3,280 EMS calls for service and 1,869 fire calls for service, for a total of 5,129 calls for service to the community and an average of 38 medical transfers between medical facilities per month for a total of 459 transfers for 2017. 

Use of apparatus is a challenge as we work to meet the needs of the department the aging fleet of ambulances is an ongoing issue for the department.  The process of replacing the ambulances for the department has not been based on need rather than if the unit is in need of replacement.   JCFD recommends that a system of replacement of ambulances is considered at every 4 years.  This will reduce the maintenance cost for units and ensure the safety of the JCFD personnel, shareholder and customers we serve.

            The JCFD has communications in operation and are managing the system.  The system of radios are aging and becoming obsolete.  The need for improved communications is essential for the safety of all responders and the public.  Providing clear and understandable communications is necessary to meet the mission of the JCFD.

             Handheld radios are at a point of their life cycle that the units are not supported by the manufacture.  The handheld units in service with the JCFD are a mixture of radio brands at this time JCFD has 4 Brands of handheld radios (Kenwood, Harris, Vertex and Motorola).  None are in compliance with the national interoperable standard P25 Compliance for interoperability of communications with outside agencies.  Repair of handhelds will not be feasible in the future as the units are no longer supported by the manufactures.  We are researching a process to apply for a grant to replace the radios to reduce impact on the Community.

 

            The JCFD is working on improving the re-call response for major incidents, by reacquiring a single source notification system or pagers.  The paging system is the only approved source of notification the FSRS/ISO will accept.  The pagers are in the department and need to be programs and used by the firefighters. 

            The staffing of the shifts is an ongoing issue to maintain the minimum needed to safely respond to incidents and conduct operations.  With the current shift rotation of 16 personnel assigned and allowance of personnel off of 2 per shift for scheduled vacations and unknown results of sick leave and injury time off it is necessary to look for a solution to improve shift manpower with our current mission to 18 per shift with the same minimum personal off duty and a minimum staffing recommendation of 14.

                        To reach this goal would require an investment of $215,000.00 annually for 3 personal (1 per shift) or an estimated 430,000.00 annually for a full 6 personnel (2 per shift).  This would allow for the estimated average minimum staffing of 14 with a reduction in potential overtime.  This is a long term goal of the department to regain the position that were eliminated during previous events of the city to maintain operations for the community during a financial crisis.

            Through the examination of the training system in 2017 after the FRFS Inspection the JCFD worked to develop the Training Division that is responsible for the management and coordination of firefighter training for the department and maintaining the program to ensure that the minimum standards are being met on a regular basis.  Development of the program has required a Division Chief of Training to be established and provide the needed services. Continuous reevaluation of progress is ongoing to ensure our mission is being met.

            The Building Familiarization for Pre-Incident Planning Program is an ongoing program that requires the Company Officers of each station to develop a plan to engage and conduct the surveys of the facilities within their area of responsibility.  The process and method of a preplan will need to be provided as this program is not in existence at this time.  This is a basic skill and responsibility of the first due company to achieve the knowledge of the hazards in the community and work to have a plan to respond to potential hazards.

            JCFD has developed a Code Enforcement position of Fire Marshal.  This position is responsible for the enforcement of Fire & Life Safety Codes adopted by the Governing Body.  This position is tasked with the inspections of occupancies and the investigation of incidents that are the responsibility of the Fire Marshal.  Having this responsibility allows for a single program to be managed for the community to receive the highest level of service in the delivery of the adopted codes and allow for the education of the public on these codes to work to ensure a safer community. With the addition of a Fire Marshal the qualification for the Certified Fire Investigators will be on a continual basis and improve the abilities of our Fire Investigators.  The JCFD is working to improve the program and the abilities to prove that the Certified Fire Investigators are receiving the training needed to maintain their professional competencies.    

            JCFD has a team concept to address the Fire & Life Safety Education of the community. The team is comprised of firefighters that are competent in the Fire & Life Safety Education of the community.  These programs engage the community and educate on the need for personal safety practices.  The program has been limited to a small audience and will be expanded to a larger audience for more access to the community to reach more of the public.  

            2017 has been a year of change for the JCFD and the years to come will also bring change as we work to develop a system of service that exceeds the expectations of the shareholder and customers of the community.   

           

 

 

 

           


 

 JCFD Training Division

 

        JCFD is an all hazards service that responds to the needs of the community.   Skills training is necessary to maintain and grow the skills set needed to respond to the incidents that can and may occur in our community.   The Training division is responsible for the coordination of basic and advanced evolutions that provide for the members for the JCFD to build skills and maintain the highest level of proficiency.  The skill set needed by a Firefighter today is challenging to maintain.  The Training Division is essential to ensure that opportunity is presented for the firefighter to improve skills and become a safer and efficient member of the team.

        The Training Division is a responsibility that coordinates the needed events and brings all the needed logistical items together to ensure the event is successful and the Firefighter is able to gain the needed skills to practice and improve their proficiency as a team.  The collaboration of resources and the coordination of course work is essential to achieve the mission of the Training Division. 

        Reviewing the resources and methodologies and collection of data to accumulate the information needed to improve the product of training is important to the success of the training system of the department. Analytics are used to provide the needed data assist in the needs assessment of the skills of the department and provide data for improvements in the training system.    


 

 

JCFD Fire Inspection / Investigation Division  

       Fire Inspections relies on a specific set of skills to manage the responsibility of ensuring the codes adopted by the City of Junction City are followed.  The need to ensure this is to protect the public and the individual occupancy from unnecessary loss.  This responsibility is essential to the ability of the community to conduct business and establish a solid economic base for the community.  Without code enforcement a community can be faced with hazards that could injure a citizen, cause a fire, destroy a business or cause unnecessary death.

        Fire Inspections are a responsibility to provide the first level of protection to the community to be proactive and not reactive to an issue.  The prevention of an incident saves the community time, money and emotional strain.  Working with the community and educating our partners on their responsibility to meet the codes protects the community at large and the property owner.  Through Fire Inspections our community is a safer place to live, work and enjoy.

        Fire Investigations are a necessary responsibility that assist in the explanation of how a fire occurs and to provide information that assist in how to prevent fires.   Fire Investigations are essential in the event a fire is suspicious or intentional.  Investigation of these fires provides the evidence needed to present a case to the courts in the event it is necessary to charge an individual for intentionally causing a fire (Arson Crimes).

 

 

 

JCFD OPERATIONS DIVISION

        The Operations Division of the JCFD is a dual role responsibility of Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS).  This Division is supervised by the Division Chief of Operations, who is responsible for daily operations.  This responsibility is not limited to response, logistics, apparatus/vehicle maintenance or building/facility maintenance.  Supervision of the Station Captains of each station and each shift are a part of the responsibility of the Division Operations Chief.  

        The Operations Division is responsible for the response services to the community.  Through management of the Station Captains, assignments for responsibilities are managed and tasks assigned.  The Operations Division is responsible for all equipment maintenance, logistical management of services, and conducting the training evaluations for Fire and EMS needed to improve skills and services.

 

 

 

JCFD 2017 Budget for Fire

                                     Budgeted                 Spent        

Total                   2,735,176.00       2,720,842.68


 

2017 Incidents Fire

National Fire Incident Reporting System Data

Average Response time to incidents for 2017:           3:46 Minutes

Average Number of Personnel Responding to Structure Fire Incidents: 14

National and ISO Recommendations: 16 Personnel on All Structure Fires

(Based on the NFPA 1710 Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations, and Special Operations to the Public by Career Fire Departments and Insurance Services Office, Public Protection Classification Items 513, 549, 571)

Monthly Responses by Stations

                            Jan       Feb      Mar     Apr     May    June        July    Aug   Sept   Oct    Nov   Dec   Total

     Sta. 1               126     116       111      109      116      114          102      119     112    101     85      97      1308

     Sta. 2                 48       40       49       49         57       47              53        52        43      42     36     45            561

                                      

                                                                                                                                          2017 Total           1869

 

 

 

 

Times of Calls

00:00 – 07:00                        08:00 – 17:00                18:00 to 23:00

      443                                         902                                       524

Structure Fire Incidents

Dollar Value Saved VS Loss Analysis for 2017

     No. of incidents                      Total Values          Total Losses         Total Saved             Percent Saved

                    69                      $16,513,000.00           $5,244,900.00        $11,268,100.00         68.24%

 

         Injuries or Fatalities 

Civilian Fatalities                          1         

Firefighter Injuries                        6

 

Other Fires responded to by JCFD 

            Vehicle Fires                                                                                                     7

              Outside Fires     Non-Structure / Non Vehicle                                                7

              Wildland/Interface Fires                                                                                   19

              Rubbish/Dumpsters                                                                                          15

              Rescue/Emergency Medical                                                                             1562

              False alarms      

                           Malicious/Mischievous                                                                       2

                           System Malfunctions                                                                           46

                           Unintentional                                                                                       103

                           Other                                                                                                      11                                                                                                       

              Mutual Aid Given                                                                                             2

              Hazardous Materials Response                                                                        33

              Hazardous response NOT Hazardous Materials                                             27

              Responses listed as Other/Public Assist                                                           273

 

 

JCFD 2017 Budget for EMS

                                   Budgeted              Spent        

Total                      2,273,067.00     2,207,434.08

JCFD EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES   

       Management of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for the JCFD is the responsibility of the Fire Chief, as the EMS Service Director, with guidance from the EMS Medical Director.  This is through a contractual agreement with Geary County and the City of Junction City that has been in place since 1962.  This agreement provides EMS services for all of Geary County by the City of Junction City.  In 1992 the City of Junction City allowed consolidation of Fire and EMS to a single department to provide these services.

        All EMS services are provided to the community in accordance with the Kansas Board of Emergency Medical Services (KBEMS), as provided by State of Kansas Statues (K. S. A.) and KBEMS regulations  (K. A. R.).   Through the process directed by KBEMS the JCFD develops EMS protocols with approval of the EMS Medical Director and the supporting Hospital.  The maintenance of this program is the responsibility of the EMS Service Director.

        The JCFD has developed a team approach to keep informed of the current issues facing EMS services this provides the venue for services to be quantified and reviewed for performance.  The Program Manager is a collateral duty taken on as an added responsibility to assist the EMS Service Director in the development of continuing education, initial education of new hires, and systems management for the improvement of services. As the EMS system develops a continuous process of Quality Assurance is in place to critique the service and ensure the system is providing the highest level of service.

EMS Revenues and Uncollectable Fees

Revenues Collected for Service              $741,015.20

        These REVENUES COLLECTED FOR SERVICE are the funds the EMS service is paid by Medicare, Medicaid, Veteran’s Administration, TRICARE, and agreed payments from private insurance companies.

 

Insurance Contractual Obligation         -$520,110.52

       The INSURANCE CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATION are the funds that are NOT collected for the services provided to Medicare, Medicaid, Veteran’s Administration, TRICARE, and agreed payments from private insurance companies. This is the amount not received as payment for the full cost of a service.  Depending on the insurer and the policy the full reimbursement for service is not provided.  Medicare, Medicaid, Veteran’s Administration and TRICARE insurances only pay a specific amount set by the agency for services this is an estimated to be less than 35% of the cost of the service.

 

Bad Debt Expense                                                -$270,881.46

       The BAD DEBT EXPENSE includes the amounts the service cannot collect from patients who have no insurance and no way to pay for the services.  These are handled as a loss as the collection for services is not known and all attempts to collect have expired.

 

 

 

 

What is the cost for EMS services?

        The cost for services is based on multiple factors that add together that give an estimate to the total cost for service.  These factors include:

        1)   Average man-hours during the call; How many and what level of care is provided

2)   Cost of continuing education for personnel to maintain qualifications for State and National Agencies

        3)   Use of the apparatus/vehicle, estimated operational cost of use of the apparatus/vehicle during a call

        4)   Maintenance cost of the apparatus/vehicle, regular routine and non- routine maintenance cost

        5)   Cost of medical equipment used, hard equipment, Monitors, Suction, other durable equipment

        6)   Cost of disposable supplies, gauze, oxygen tubing, gloves, needles, and other onetime use items

        7)   Cost of Pharmaceuticals, intravenous solutions, approved medications and approved narcotics    


 

Ambulance Fee Schedule

Effective July 1, 2015  

 

Fee Type                                                                                                                     Current Fee    

 

Basic Life Support Service with transport Non Emergent                                                     $400.00                                  

Basic Life Support Service with transport Emergent                                                             $480.00                      

Advance Life Support Service standard transport urgent Not Life Threating                     $550.00                      

Advance Life Support Service Emergent urgent Potentially Life Threating                         $625.00                      

Advance Life Support Service Emergent Life Threating & Trauma Responses                  $800.00                      

Specialty Care Transport Transfers from one facility to another                                                 $850.00                      

Mileage (per mile) Transfers from one facility to another                                         $12.00 per mile

 

Stand by rate per hour to return the patient to original facility                                     $100.00 per hour

 

Non Resident                                                  $100.00                       

  (added to base rate)

 

Non Transport                                                 $ 60.00

                       

Non Transport with Treatment                       $ 80.00

                       

 

Some supplies are billed on transports and non-transports for other insurance companies that are not contractual and self-pay accounts.  Contractual insurance companies are:  Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare, Blue Cross, etc.:

                                                                          

Basic supplies                         $ 25.00                       

C-Collar                                  $ 30.00                       

I/O                                           $150.00                      

IV Start                                   $ 35.00                       

Oxygen                                   $ 30.00                       


 

2017 Incidents EMS

2017 EMS Runs in Review















Responses by District

10

20

30

40

50

Total

Sta 1

Sta 2

Sta 1

Sta 2

Sta 1

Sta 2

Sta 1

Sta 2

Sta 1

Sta 2

Sta 1

Sta 2

#

January

46

3

48

55

27

2

48

4

15

28

184

92

276

February

33

9

59

55

18

4

38

5

14

13

162

86

248

March

32

3

45

55

38

5

50

3

21

40

186

106

292

April

38

7

44

60

29

3

42

4

12

23

165

97

262

May

33

3

49

75

26

3

54

7

18

29

180

117

297

June

27

12

37

62

28

10

57

5

9

32

158

121

279

July

45

13

23

64

33

7

37

5

10

50

148

139

287

August

36

15

29

65

40

2

46

6

14

40

165

128

293

September

32

12

32

58

26

8

50

9

16

23

156

110

266

October

28

7

40

57

22

7

43

6

13

36

146

113

259

November

32

5

47

52

14

5

40

6

15

33

148

101

249

December

35

12

37

65

24

9

36

8

6

20

138

114

252


417

101

490

723

325

65

541

68

163

367

1936

1324

3260


518

1213

390

609

530

59%

41%


Patient Age 

Patient Age

0-6

112

4%

330.1

11%

7-12

67

2%

13-18

151

5%

19-24

309

11%

800.3

27%

25-30

269

9%

31-36

222

8%

37-42

171

6%

586.2

20%

43-48

176

6%

49-54

239

8%

55-60

212

7%

635.2

22%

61-66

210

7%

67-72

213

7%

73-78

199

7%

565.2

19%

79-84

133

8%

85+

233

8%

2916



 

Patient Transported to

Patient Transported

Geary Community

1485

Via Christi - Manhattan

158

Stormont

112

IACH

69

SRHC

62

Children's

20

KU MED

15

Valley View

15

St Francis

11

Wesley

3

Shawnee Mission

1

Sterling House

1

1965

 
   Type of Response  

Level of Care

ALS-AEMT

1216

ALS-Intermediate

2

ALS-Paramedic

1568

ALS-Physician

1

BLS-AEMT

174

BLS-Basic /EMT

297

ALS-Community Paramedicine

1

BLS-Community Paramedicine

1

3260

  


 


Disposition of Patient Contact

Disposition of Patient Contact

Assist, Public







11

Assist, Unit

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Canceled (Prior to Arrival At Scene)

 

 

 

 

147

Canceled (Prior to Going En Route)





1

Canceled on Scene (No Patient Contact)




43

Canceled on Scene (No Patient Found)

 

 

 

23

Patient Dead at Scene-No Resuscitation Attempted (Without Transport)

34

Patient Dead at Scene-Resuscitation Attempted (With Transport)

2

Patient Dead at Scene-Resuscitation Attempted (Without Transport)

2

Patient Evaluated, No Treatment/Transport Required

 

 

400

Patient Refused Evaluation/Care (With Transport)



3

Patient Refused Evaluation/Care (Without Transport)



315

Patient Treated, Released (AMA)





20

Patient Treated, Released (per protocol)

 

 

 

110

Patient Treated, Transferred Care to Another EMS Unit

 

13

Patient Treated, Transported by Law Enforcement



32

Patient Treated, Transported by Private Vehicle



12

Patient Treated, Transported by this EMS Unit

 

 

1976

Standby-No Services or Support Provided

 

 

 

43

Standby-Public Safety, Fire, or EMS Operational Support Provided

72

3260

 

 

 

EMS Transfers from Geary County to Other Facilities

EMS transfers from Geary Community Hospital, VA Clinic, and TRI Care Clinic in Junction City to other facilities is a regular service provided by JCFD.

The facilities destinations are throughout Kansas:

Children’s Mercy Hospital

Fort Riley Irwin Army Community Hospital

Salina Regional Health Center

Stormont Vail Health Care

Shawnee Mission Medical Center

St. Francis Medical Center

Stormont-Vail Health Care

University of Kansas Hospital

Veterans Administration Hospital Topeka

Via-Christi Hospital Manhattan KS

Via-Christi St Francis Campus

Wesley Medical Center



 

JCFD responds to a request for transfer of patients from one facility to another an average of 38.25 transfers per month.

 

 



Insurance Services Office

Public Protection Classification

   16 November of 2017, two days into my new position here with the City of Junction City I received notification that the JCFD was overdue for its Fire Suppression Rating.  I was notified that they would be coming to JCFD in three weeks.  This was my first challenge and a great experience to learn the JCFD and its operational capabilities.  (Chief Terry Johnson) 

     ISO collects and evaluates information from communities in the United States on their structure fire suppression capabilities. The data is analyzed using our Fire Suppression Rating Schedule (FSRS) and then a Public Protection Classification (PPC™) grade is assigned to the community. The surveys are conducted whenever it appears that there is a possibility of a PPC change. As such, the PPC program provides important, up-to-date information about fire protection services throughout the country.

     The FSRS recognizes fire protection features only as they relate to suppression of first alarm structure fires. In many communities, fire suppression may be only a small part of the fire department's overall responsibility. ISO recognizes the dynamic and comprehensive duties of a community's fire service, and understands the complex decisions a community must make in planning and delivering emergency services. However, in developing a community's PPC grade, only features related to reducing property losses from structural fires are evaluated. Multiple alarms, simultaneous incidents and life safety are not considered in this evaluation. The PPC program evaluates the fire protection for small to average size buildings. Specific properties with a Needed Fire Flow in excess of 3,500 gallons per minute (GPM) are evaluated separately and assigned an individual PPC grade.

 

     A community's investment in fire mitigation is a proven and reliable predictor of future fire losses. Statistical data on insurance losses bears out the relationship between excellent fire protection - as measured by the PPC program - and low fire losses. So, insurance companies use PPC information for marketing, underwriting, and to help establish fair premiums for homeowners and commercial fire insurance. In general, the price of fire insurance in a community with a good PPC grade is substantially lower than in a community with a poor PPC grade, assuming all other factors are equal.

     ISO is an independent company that serves insurance companies, communities, fire departments, insurance regulators, and others by providing information about risk. ISO's expert staff collects information about municipal fire suppression efforts in communities throughout the United States. In each of those communities, ISO analyzes the relevant data and assigns a PPC grade - a number from 1 to 10. Class 1 represents an exemplary fire suppression program, and Class 1O indicates that the area's fire suppression program does not meet ISO's minimum criteria.

     ISO's PPC program evaluates communities according to a uniform set of criteria, incorporating nationally recognized standards developed by the National Fire Protection Association and the American Water Works Association. A community’s PPC grade depends on:

Needed Fire Flows, which are representative building locations used to determine the theoretical amount of water necessary for fire suppression purposes.

Emergency Communications, including emergency reporting, Telecommunicators, and dispatching systems.

 Fire Department, including equipment, staffing, training, geographic distribution of fire companies, operational considerations, and community risk reduction.

Water Supply, including inspection and flow testing of hydrants, alternative water supply operations, and a careful evaluation of the amount of available water compared with the amount needed to suppress fires up to 3,500 gallons per minute (GPM).

City of Junction City PPC Rating

     A review of the Emergency Communications accounts for 10% of the total classification. A review of the Fire Department accounts for 50% of the total classification. ISO focuses on a fire department's first alarm response and initial attack to minimize potential loss.  A review of the Water Supply system accounts for 40% of the total classification. ISO reviews the water supply a community uses to determine the adequacy for fire suppression purposes.

     There is one additional factor considered in calculating the final score - Divergence.  Even the best fire department will be less than fully effective if it has an inadequate water supply. Similarly, even a superior water supply will be less than fully effective if the fire department lacks the equipment or personnel to use the water. The FSRS score is subject to modification by a divergence factor, which recognizes disparity between the effectiveness of the fire department and the water supply. The Divergence factor mathematically reduces the score based upon the relative difference between the fire department and water supply scores. The factor is introduced in the final equation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earned                          Credit

FSRS ITEM

Credit                       Available

Emergency Communications

 

414. Credit for Emergency Reporting

2.40               3

422. Credit for Telecommunicators

2.52               4

432. Credit for Dispatch Circuits

1.80               3

440. Credit for Emergency Communications

6.72             10

Fire Department

 

513. Credit for Engine Companies

6.00               6

523. Credit for Reserve Pumpers

0.50           0.5

532. Credit for Pumper Capacity

3.00               3

549. Credit for Ladder Service

1.04               4

553. Credit for Reserve Ladder and Service Trucks

0.00            0.5

561. Credit for Deployment Analysis

5.44             10

571. Credit for Company Personnel

8.56             15

581. Credit for Training

5.14               9

730. Credit for Operational Considerations

2.00               2

590. Credit for Fire Department

 

Water Supply

616. Credit for Supply System 621. Credit for Hydrants

631. Credit for Inspection and Flow Testing

640. Credit for Water Supply Divergence

1050. Community Risk Reduction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Credit

31.68              50

 

23.71              30

2.34               3

6.20               7

32.25              40

-3.45                 --

3.52                       5.50

 

70.72                        105.5

 

 

Final Community Classification = 03/3X


 

 

 

     Emergency Communications

     Emergency Communications for reporting incidents is processed through the Geary County/City of Junction City Public Safety Access Point (PSAP) at the City of Junction City Police Department (JCPD).  The PSAP system is currently processing through an upgrade of the system and will add features to improve the processes.  Ten percent (10%) of a community's overall score is based on how well the communications center receives and dispatches fire alarms. Our field representative evaluated; Communications facilities provided for the general public to report structure fires, Enhanced 9-1-1 Telephone Service including wireless, Computer-aided dispatch (CAD) facilities,           Alarm receipt and processing at the communication center, Training and certification of Telecommunicators and Facilities used to dispatch fire department companies to reported structure fires.

Item 414 Credit for Emergency Reporting: reflects the score of the current PSAP system.  This may improve with the upgrades of the PSAP. 

Item 422 Credit for Telecommunicators: reflects the score for the number and proven training of the Telecommunication Dispatchers.  The section is evaluated on how many Telecommunicators are on duty and the total of the incoming calls to the PSAP.  With the number of incoming calls to the PSAP and the multidiscipline system in place the numbers of dispatchers on duty is not adequate for the system in place.    

Item 432 Credit for Dispatch Circuits: information about the number and type of dispatch circuits needed to transmit alarms to fire department members, NFPA 1221, Standard for the Installation, Maintenance, and Use of Emergency Services Communications Systems. If all responding firefighters are in the same building as the communication center and if the communications center personnel alert them, no dispatch circuit is needed. No credit for facilities that are installed but not used or tested according to the general criteria of NFPA 1221. Currently the dispatch circuit is a single alert for two stations.  The system currently does not meet the standard.

DEPARTMENT GOAL

     Work with the Geary County & Junction City 911 Committee to improve the services of the PSAP.

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

     This section gives procedures and formulas for evaluating fire departments, including; engine, ladder, and/or service companies, equipment carried, response to reported structure fires, deployment analysis of companies, available firefighters, and training. Fifty percent of a community's overall score is based upon the fire department's structure fire suppression system. ISO's field representative evaluated: Engine and ladder/service vehicles including reserve apparatus, Equipment carried, Response to reported structure fires Deployment analysis of companies Available and/or responding firefighters Training

     The Basic Fire Flow: The Basic Fire Flow for the community is determined by the review of the Needed Fire Flows for selected buildings in the community. The fifth largest Needed Fire Flow is determined to be the Basic Fire Flow. The Basic Fire Flow has been determined to be 3500 GPM.     Automatic Aid: This section defines the credits available for automatic aid meeting the needs of the fire protection area under evaluation. Credit is available for engine companies and/or ladder/service companies from outside the fire protection area boundaries and within 5 road miles of the boundaries. The automatic-aid companies must respond under a legal contract or resolution or must demonstrate documented performance for a minimum of one year. The aiding fire departments must operate under a predetermined response plan for initial alarms. JCFD has no Automatic Aid agreements.

 

 

Item 513 - Credit for Engine Companies

     Item 513 Credit for Engine Companies (CEC): This item reviews the number of engine companies, their pump capacity, hose testing, pump testing and the equipment carried on the in-service pumpers. To be recognized, pumper apparatus must meet the general criteria of NFPA 1901, Standard for Automotive Fire Apparatus which include a minimum 250 GPM pump, an emergency warning system, a 300 gallon water tank, and hose. At least 1 apparatus must have a permanently mounted pump rated at 750 GPM or more at 150 psi.  The review of the number of needed pumpers considers the response distance to built-upon areas; the Basic Fire Flow; and the method of operation. Multiple alarms, simultaneous incidents, and life safety are not considered.

The greatest value of A, B, or C below is needed in the fire district to suppress fires in structures with a Needed Fire Flow of 3,500 GPM or less: 3 engine companies

a)    3 engine companies to provide fire suppression services to areas to meet NFPA 1710 criteria or within 1½ miles.

b)    3 engine companies to support a Basic Fire Flow of 3500 GPM.

c)    3 engine companies based upon the fire department's method of operation to provide a minimum two engine response to all first alarm structure fires.

The FSRS recognizes that there are 3 engine companies in service.

Item 513 "Credit for Engine Companies (CEC)" = 6.00 points

Item 523 -Credit for Reserve Pumpers

Item 523 Credit for Reserve Pumpers (CRP):   This item reviews the number and adequacy of the pumpers and their equipment. The number of needed reserve pumpers is 1 for each 8 needed engine companies determined in Item 513, or any fraction thereof.

Item 523 "Credit for Reserve Pumpers (CRP)" = 0.50 points

DEPARTMENT GOAL

     JCFD has applied for an Assistance to Firefighters Grant through the department of Homeland Security to replace the department’s last aging engine, Engine 3 a 2006 Engine with 97,000 miles and considerable mechanical and structural issues that economically cannot be overcome.  

Item 549 Truck/Ladder/Service Companies

    Item 549 Credit for Ladder Service (CLS):  of the FSRS recognizes that there is a need for 2 ladder companies in service. These companies are needed to provide fire suppression services to areas to meet NFPA 1710 criteria or within 2½ miles and the number of buildings with a Needed Fire Flow over 3,500 PGM or 3 stories or more in height, or the method of operation.  Junction City has 19 facilities in the jurisdiction of the city that require a Needed Fire Flow of 3,500 GPM or more that are in the 2 ½ mile response arears of all Stations in the city. 

     The FSRS recognizes that there are 0 service companies in service. FSRS recognizes that the City of Junction City has a Ladder unit, however the unit is not fully staffed and is considered by the FSRS not to be in service.  The minimum manning as recognized by the NFPA Standard 1710 section 5.2.3.2.1 “These fire companies shall be staffed with a minimum of four on-duty members.” 

 Item 549 "Credit for Ladder Service (CLS)" = 1.04 points out of 4 possible points

 

DEPARTMENT GOAL

     In the future planning of the JCFD it will be necessary to visit the proper manning of a minimum of 4 personnel assigned to the Truck Company/Ladder to gain the needed recognition of the apparatus. We currently staff the apparatus with 1 Driver and when staffing permits an addition member.  

Item 553 Credit for Reserve Ladder and Service Trucks (CRLS)

     Item 553 Credit for Reserve Ladder and Service Trucks (CRLS): This item considers the adequacy of ladder and service apparatus when one (or more in larger communities) of these apparatus are out of service. The number of needed reserve ladder and service trucks is 1 for each 8 needed ladder and service companies that were determined to be needed in Item 540, or any fraction thereof.

Item 553 "Credit for Reserve Ladder and Service Trucks (CRLS)" = 0.00 points out of 0.5 points.

 

DEPARTMENT GOAL

    The JCFD in 2017 acquired a Rescue/Service unit that will fill this roll and provide services as a Technical Rescue apparatus and Hazardous Materials apparatus.  Future FRFS ratings will reflect the improvement.

 

Item 561 -Deployment Analysis

                 Item 561 Deployment Analysis (DA):  is reviewed. This Item examines the number and adequacy of existing engine and ladder-service companies to cover built-upon areas of the city.  To determine the Credit for Distribution, first the Existing Engine Company (EC) points and the Existing Engine Companies (EE) determined in Item 513 are considered along with Ladder Company Equipment (LCE) points, Service Company Equipment (SCE) points, Engine-Ladder Company Equipment (ELCE) points, and Engine-Service Company Equipment (ESCE) points determined in Item 549.

     Secondly, as an alternative to determining the number of needed engine and ladder/service companies through the road-mile analysis, a fire protection area may use the results of a systematic performance evaluation. This type of evaluation analyzes computer-aided dispatch (CAD) history to demonstrate that, with its current deployment of companies, the fire department meets the time constraints for initial arriving engine and initial full alarm assignment in accordance with the general criteria of in NFPA 1710, Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations, and Special Operations to the Public by Career Fire Departments.  A determination is made of the percentage of built upon area within 1½ miles of a first-due engine company and within 2½ miles of a first-due ladder-service company.

Item 561 "Credit Deployment Analysis (DA)"= 5.44 points out of 10

 

DEPARTMENT GOAL

     JCFD’s LONG TERM GOAL is to install a third station in the Northwest segment of the community.  This is necessary to meet the deployment of responsibility for coverage of the Community and maintain a consistency of service. 

     The third station for JCFD would be a single station with an Engine and Medic unit primarily assigned with other departmental assets for responses assigned as needed.  JCFD has the apparatus and equipment to support a station; however, the structure and importantly the personnel are not in place.  The structure its self is a singular expense, the continual expense of logistics and personnel have to be considered as the process moves forward. 

     A minimum of 21 personnel per shift will be needed to meet the responsibility of the department.  This staffing of 21 persons assigned to each shift to allow for scheduled vacations, sick leave and other absences. This will provide the needed personnel to man each station with 6 persons per station as a minimum. 

     JCFD can establish a third station with maneuvering of personnel already on duty and needed equipment to a third station.  This would then require a minimum of adding 15 personnel to the department.  However this will lead to overtime expenses to meet minimum staffing needs with scheduled vacations, trainings and sick leaves.

 

Item 571 Credit for Company Personnel (CCP)

     Item 571 Credit for Company Personnel (CCP): reviews the average number of existing firefighters and company officers available to respond to reported first alarm structure fires in the city. The on-duty strength is determined by the yearly average of total firefighters and company officers on-duty considering vacations, sick leave, holidays, "Kelley" days and  other absences.

     When a fire department operates under a minimum staffing policy, this may be used in lieu of determining the yearly average of on-duty company personnel.  Firefighters on apparatus not credited under Items 513 and 549 that regularly respond to reported first alarms to aid engine, ladder, and service companies are included in this item as increasing the total company strength. Firefighters staffing ambulances or other units serving the general public are credited if they participate in fire-fighting operations, the number depending upon the extent to which they are available and are used for response to first alarms of fire.  Off-shift career firefighters and company officers responding on first alarms are considered on the same basis as on-call personnel.  

     The FSRS recognizes 13.00 on-duty personnel and an average of 0.00 on-call personnel responding on first alarm structure fires. NFPA 1710 structural response standard for structural response is a minimum of 15 on-duty personnel for the 1st alarm response for a residential structure, The initial full alarm assignment to a structure fire in a typical 2000 ft2 (186 m2), two-story, single-family dwelling without a basement and with no exposures.  Open-Air Strip Mall and Garden-Style Apartment — minimum of 28 members , the initial full alarm assignment to a structure fire in a typical open-air strip shopping center ranging from 13,000 ft2 to 196,000 ft2 in size. High-Rise — minimum of 42 members.  The initial full alarm assignment to a fire in a building with the highest floor greater than 75ft above the lowest level of fire department vehicle access must provide for a minimum of 42 members.

 Item 571 "Credit for Company Personnel (CCP)" = 8.56 points out of a possible 15points.

 

DEPARTMENT GOAL

     The JCFD is improving the on-call/re-call response by reacquiring a single source notification system or PAGERS.  The paging system is the only approved source of notification the FRFS will accept.  The pagers are in the department and need to be programs and used by the firefighters.  The staffing of the shifts is an ongoing issue to maintain the minimum needed to safely respond to incidents and conduct operations.  With the current shift rotation of 16 personnel assigned and allowance of scheduled vacations of 2 per shift and unknown results of sick leave and injury time off it is necessary to look for a solution to improve shift manpower with our current mission of 16 per shift to 18 per shift with the same minimum personal off duty and a minimum staffing recommendation of 14. 

     To reach this goal would require an investment of $215,000.00 for 3 personal (1 per shift) and an estimated $430,000.00 for a full 6 personnel (2 per shift).  This would allow for the estimated average minimum staffing of 14 with a reduction in potential overtime.  This is a LONG TERM GOAL of the department to regain the position that were eliminated during previous events of the city.

 

Item 581 Calculation for Training of Members

     Item 581 Calculation for Training of Members: The calculation for training of members of the department in the basics of firefighting and operational readiness.  Fire departments must keep training records in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1401, Recommended Practice for Fire Service Training Reports and Records.  All personnel engaged in fire suppression activities must receive training in subjects related to fighting structure fires. Evaluate training as follows:

A. Training Facilities and Use: Training conducted at a live fire training facility. Live fire training structure including smoke room. Drill tower at least 3 stories in height.  Training area at least 2.0 acres in size.

B. Use of Facilities:  For full credit under this item, each member of the department should attend 18 hours of training at the facilities credited in Section 580A1.

C. Company Training Program: Company training at fire stations including training using streets, buildings, and open areas, 16 hours per company member per month.

D. Officer Training and Certification Program:

1.  Officer Certification:  Certification of each current officer with responsibilities in fire suppression in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications.

2. Officer Continuing Education: Continuing education for officer training on- or off-site, 12 hours per year for all officers.  Officer training should be in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications; NFPA 1521, Standard for Fire Department Safety Officer; NFPA 1561, Standard on Emergency Services Incident Management System.

E. New Driver/Operator Training Program: 60 hours (or certification) in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1002, Standard for Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator Professional Qualifications.  The New Driver Operator Training Program should be in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1002, Standard for Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator Professional Qualifications, and NFPA 1451, Standard for a Fire Service Vehicle Operations Training Program.

F.  Existing Driver/Operator Training Program:  12 hours per year.  Driver and operator training should be in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1002, Standard for Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator Professional Qualifications, and NFPA 1451 Standard for a Fire Service Vehicle Operations Training Program.

G.  Hazardous Materials Training Program: 6 hours per member per year.  Hazardous materials training should be at a minimum awareness level in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 472, Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents.

H.  Recruit Training Program: 240 hours per recruit within the first year of employment or tenure (or certification) in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications.  Firefighter training should be in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications. Give credit for class hours spent towards the completion of Firefighter I and Firefighter II training (in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1001). Firefighters who obtain the Firefighter I and Firefighter II designation (in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1001) before employment or within the first year of employment or tenure meet the intent of Section 580G.

I.  Building Familiarization for Pre-Incident Planning Program: Annual pre-incident planning. The fire department should make building familiarization and pre-incident planning tours of each commercial, industrial, institutional, and other similar building at least annually. Records of the inspections (whether in electronic or other formats) should include complete and up-to-date notes and sketches, which must be available to the responding incident commander.  Building familiarization and pre-incident planning should be in accordance with the general criteria of NFPA 1620, Standard for Pre-Incident Planning.

Item 580 "Credit for Training (CT)" = 5.14 points out of 9 points

DEPARTMENT GOAL

           Through the examination of the training system in 2017 after the FRFS Inspection the JCFD worked to develop the Training Division that is responsible for the management and coordination of firefighter training for the department and maintaining the program to ensure that the minimum standards are being met on a regular basis.  Development of the program has required a Division Chief of Training to be established and provide the needed services.

           The Building Familiarization for Pre-Incident Planning Program is an ongoing program that requires the Officers of each station to develop a plan to engage and conduct the surveys of the facilities within their area of responsibility.  The process and method of a preplan will need to be provided as this program I not in existence at this time.  This is a basic skill and responsibility of the first due company to achieve the knowledge of the hazards in the community and work to have a plan to respond to potential hazards.

Community Risk Reduction

 

 

Enforcement

 

 

Fire Prevention Code Regulations (PCR)

 

10.00

 

10

 

Evaluation of fire prevention code regulations in effect.

 

 

 

Fire Prevention Staffing (PS)

0.07

8

 

Evaluation of staffing for fire prevention activities.

 

 

 

Fire Prevention Certification and Training (PCT)

3.00

6

 

Evaluation of the certification and training of fire prevention code enforcement personnel.

 

 

 

Fire Prevention Programs (PCP)

13.68

16

 

Evaluation of fire prevention programs.

 

 

 







 

DEPARTMENT GOAL

            JCFD has developed a Code Enforcement position of Fire Marshal.  This position is responsible for the enforcement of Fire & Life Safety Codes adopted by the Governing Body.  This position is tasked with the inspections of occupancies and the investigation of incidents that are the responsibility of the Fire Marshal.  Having this responsibility allows for a single program to be managed for the community to receive the highest level of service in the delivery of the adopted codes and allow for the education of the public on these codes to work to ensure a safer community.

Item 1033- Credit for Public Fire Safety Education

 

Item 1033- Credit for Public Fire Safety Education

Earned Credit

Credit Available

Public Fire Safety Educators Qualifications and Training (FSQT)

Evaluation of public fire safety education personnel training and qualification as specified by the authority having jurisdiction.

6.25

10

Public Fire Safety Education Programs (FSP)

Evaluation of programs for public fire safety education.

14.92

30

Review of Public Safety Education Programs (CFSE) subtotal:

21.17

40

DEPARTMENT GOAL

            JCFD has a team concept to address this responsibility. The team is comprised of firefighters that are competent in the Fire & Life Safety Education of the community.  These programs engage the community and educate on the need for personal safety practices.  The program has been limited to a small audience and will be expanded to a larger audience for more access to the community to reach more of the public.  

 

Item 1044-Credit for Fire Investigation Programs

 

 

Item 1044-Credit for Fire Investigation Programs

Earned Credit

Credit Available

Fire Investigation Organization and Staffing (IOS)

Evaluation of organization and staffing for fire investigations.

8.00

8

Fire Investigator Certification and Training (IQT)

Evaluation of fire investigator certification and training.

2.15

6

Use of National Fire Incident Reporting System (IRS)

Evaluation of the use of the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) for the 3 years before the evaluation.

6.00

6

Review of Fire Investigation Programs (CIP) subtotal:

16.15

20

 

 DEPARTMENT GOAL

           With the addition of a Fire Marshal and Training Officer the qualification for the Certified Fire Investigators will be on a continual basis and improve the abilities of our Fire Investigators.  The JCFD is working to improve the program and the abilities to prove that the Certified Fire Investigators are receiving the training needed to maintain their professional competencies.    

 

 

 

 

 

Water Supply

Item 616 Credit for Supply System (CSS)

           Item 616 Credit for Supply System (CSS):  This item reviews the rate of flow that can be credited at each of the Needed Fire Flow test locations considering the supply works capacity, the main capacity and the hydrant distribution. The lowest flow rate of these items is credited for each representative location. A water system capable of delivering 250 GPM or more for a period of two hours plus consumption at the maximum daily rate at the fire location is considered minimum in the ISO review.

           The normal ability of the distribution system to deliver Needed Fire Flows at the selected building locations is reviewed. The results of a flow test at a representative test location will indicate the ability of the water mains (or fire department in the case of fire department supplies) to carry water to that location.

           The hydrant distribution is reviewed within 1,000 feet of representative test locations measured as hose can be laid by apparatus. For maximum credit, the Needed Fire Flows should be available at each location in the district. Needed Fire Flows of 2,500 GPM or less should be available for 2 hours; and Needed Fire Flows of 3,000 and 3,500 GPM should be obtainable for 3 hours.

Item 616 "Credit for Supply System (CSS)" = 23.71 points out of 30 Points

 

 

 

 

 

Item 621 - Credit for Hydrants

            Item 621 Credit for Hydrants (CH):  This item reviews the number of fire hydrants of each type compared with the total number of hydrants.

There are a total of 952 hydrants in the graded area.

 

 


   620. Hydrants, - Size, Type and Installation

Number of Hydrants

   A. With a 6 -inch or larger branch and a pumper outlet with or without -

         inch outlets

513

 

B. With a 6 -inch or larger branch and no pumper outlet but two or more       -inch outlets, or with a small foot valve, or with a small barrel

239

     C. / D. With only a 2½ -inch outlet or with less than a 6 -inch branch

200

     E. / F. Flush Type, Cistern, or Suction Point

0




 

Item 621 "Credit for Hydrants (CH)" = 2.34 points out of 3

 

 

Item 630-Credit for Inspection and Flow Testing

                       Item 630 Credit for Inspection and Flow Testing (CIT):  This item reviews the fire hydrant inspection frequency, and the completeness of the inspections. Inspection of hydrants should be in accordance with AVVWA M-17, Installation, Field Testing and Maintenance of Fire Hydrants.

Item 631 "Credit for Inspection and Fire Flow Testing (CIT)" = 6.20 points out of 7 points